Teal & Violet Trachyphyllia

$75.00

Teal & Violet Trachyphyllia is WYSIWYG, approximately 2.5-3″ in length. This trachy is a show-stopper with beautiful violet base color and teal accents! Feed this LPS coral DAILY, provide enough gentle water movement to keep it free of detritus, slowly acclimate it to stronger lighting, keep calcium levels up and place in the substrate. When lifting it out of the water, make sure it is fully deflated and try to keep it submerged when transferring since the skeleton can easily tear the tissue under its own weight. Tank should be 50 gallons or more and mature.

Out of stock

Description

Teal & Violet Trachyphyllia

Teal & Violet Trachyphyllia is WYSIWYG, approximately 2.5-3″ in length. This trachy is a show-stopper with beautiful violet base color and teal accents! Feed this LPS coral DAILY, provide enough gentle water movement to keep it free of detritus, slowly acclimate it to stronger lighting, keep calcium levels up and place in the substrate. When lifting it out of the water, make sure it is fully deflated and try to keep it submerged when transferring since the skeleton can easily tear the tissue under its own weight. Tank should be 50 gallons or more and mature.

The Open Brain Coral T. geoffroyi forms free-living polyps that have valleys with their own corallite walls. They can have up to 3 separate mouths. Their septa, or the “teeth” on the inside of the corallite wall, are large and form a ridging look under the flesh. The base of the coral is cone shaped, giving away its naturally soft substrate habitat. Their polyps are large fleshy mantles, and they come in a variety of bright colors including yellow, red, pink, brown, blue or green.

The T. geoffroyi is moderately easy to care for, they only need a lower moderate light and gentle water movement. The green variety handles a moderate lighting better. The most important care that must be exercised for a long lasting and healthy coral is daily feeding. They are voracious eaters, and if not fed well can start to recede. The polyps tentacles come out at night to feed, and may come out during the day when food is present.

Feeding

The Trachyphyllia genus, like other large polyp stony (LPS) corals, have developed several feeding strategies. Through a symbiotic relationship with a marine algae, known as zooxanthellae, they receive some of their nutrients. They also capture planktonic organisms, food particles from the water column, and can absorb dissolved organic matter. Feed it daily. They will eat mysis, fortified brine shrimp, rotifers, Cyclopeeze and other similarly sized meaty foods. Larger pieces than a typical mysis is not digestible, and although the animal “accepts” it, it will regurgitate it up later in the night. So use smaller foods or your coral can waste away in a little over a year. Typical water changes of 20% a month, 10% biweekly, or 5% weekly are needed. It has been noted that 5% weekly water changes replenish many of the needed additives and it is ultimately cheaper than purchasing additives for the water.