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Jawbreaker Mushroom and Baby

$675.00 $550.00

The Jawbreaker mushroom is the strain of Discosoma which single handedly showed us that mushroom anemones could be a striking aquarium animal and that Corallimorphs have plenty of strains worth collecting. Discosoma mushrooms are a great choice for both beginning hobbyists looking for hardy additions to their reef tank as well as experienced collectors looking to add a potentially rare showpiece to their aquarium. These corallimorphs come in a wide variety of colors and patterns, some of which are highly sought-after by reef enthusiasts. This Jawbreaker is WYSIWYG, approximately 1.5″ in diameter and baby is a lil smaller than a dime

1 in stock

SKU: Jawbreaker Mushroom-2 Categories: , , Tag:

Description

Jawbreaker Mushroom and Baby

The Jawbreaker mushroom is the strain of Discosoma which single handedly showed us that mushroom anemones could be a striking aquarium animal and that Corallimorphs have plenty of strains worth collecting. Discosoma mushrooms are a great choice for both beginning hobbyists looking for hardy additions to their reef tank as well as experienced collectors looking to add a potentially rare showpiece to their aquarium. These corallimorphs come in a wide variety of colors and patterns, some of which are highly sought-after by reef enthusiasts. This Jawbreaker is WYSIWYG, approximately 1.5″ in diameter and baby is a lil smaller than a dime.

Husbandry

Discosoma mushrooms do not require as much light as some other corals. It can be kept under normal output fluorescents without much difficulty. In some cases, it may extend more readily under subdued lighting, however these corallimorphs may display more attractive colors when placed under stronger lighting. Overexposure should be avoided. When Discosoma mushrooms get too much light on the reef, they develop oxide radicals in their flesh that resemble white bubble-like growths.
We recommend keeping the mushrooms in a relatively low flow area of the reef aquarium. Too much water flow may cause Discosoma to become stressed and not extend fully. Worse yet, the mushroom may detach altogether from its substrate. Once a mushroom gets detached it generally fares poorly unless it can reattach elsewhere.
Discosoma derives much of its energy from the products of their zooxanthellae. Originally it was thought that these mushrooms did not “feed” on anything, but rather passively absorb dissolved organics from the water column directly through its “skin.” In reef aquariums with low flow, it is possible to feed them as you can see in the video above.